Tag Archives: sci-fi

Book review: The Quantum Magician by Derek Künsken

A fast-paced heist on a galactic scale, a universe full of wildly imaginative human variants, and a narrative with a tight internal logic all combine to form a very entertaining book, which almost reaches my imaginary rank of a modern … Continue reading

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Modern classic: Seven Surrenders (Terra Ignota 2) by Ada Palmer

A book of the caliber of Too Like the Lighting is difficult to emulate, especially with a sequel that is designed to be a direct continuation of the first book. Palmer manages to do just that with yet another exceptional … Continue reading

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Flash review: Victory Citrus is Sweet by Thoraiya Dyer

This short story (missing the novelette category by a mere 15 words) has an interesting premise, a quirky central character and a hint of a redemption arc. It is a fun, quick read. However, if one thinks about it a … Continue reading

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Book review: Inhibitor Phase (Revelation Space 4) by Alastair Reynolds

Nearly two decades after the last novel from the main Revelation Space storyline, Reynolds returns with a book that’s even more expansive and bleak than the ones before. With new and some very old characters, Inhibitor Phase can be read … Continue reading

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Book review: The Past is Red by Catherynne M. Valente

Very few modern authors have the knack for presenting serious issues with so much light-hearted, yet insightful flair as Catherynne Valente. Her easy flowing prose is entertaining, inventive, and yet insidiously indoctrinates the reader into the author’s way of thinking. … Continue reading

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Book review: A Desolation Called Peace by Arkady Martine

It’s often challenging to keep a sequel as interesting and engrossing as the first book in the series.  The wonder of worldbuilding may be largely gone, and the tedium of more of the same may creep in, as the author … Continue reading

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Book review: Angles of Attack (Frontlines 3) by Marko Kloos

The Frontlines series is somewhat original by portraying its protagonists as human, with their failings, desires and small joys, and by strictly using the point of view of its central character.  There are no supermen, no overall strategic landscape from … Continue reading

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Book review: A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine

This Hugo Award winner is a weird beast.  I hesitate to call it a political thriller because it isn’t thrilling enough.  It’s definitely not a space opera, even though it is marketed as such.  It can be described as a … Continue reading

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Book review: Termination Shock by Neal Stephenson

I must confess that I have a problem with Neal Stephenson.  Based on his past performance, I have high expectations for his works, so even when he delivers something as technically proficient as Termination Shock, with interesting ideas that hit … Continue reading

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Classic review: The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch by Philip K. Dick

What do ogres and Dick’s books have in common?  They are like onions: they have several layers, and when you peel one off, another will lie underneath.  The layers in Dick’s book can be very different: they may have little … Continue reading

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