Author Archives: Bruncvik

Modern Classic: The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

Most of science fiction I’ve read in the recent years tended to gravitate towards the gritty, dark or depressing.  The stories were either cautionary tales about the dangers of technology, or about using technology for all kinds of unpleasant tasks, … Continue reading

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Book review: Planetside by Michael Mammay

Planetside is a mixed bag.  On one hand, Mammay has a refreshingly new spin at the prevailing military science fiction tropes, but on the other I found the writing and the characters a little jarring.  This was a worthy and … Continue reading

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Book review: The Consuming Fire (Interdependency 2) by John Scalzi

The second book of the Interdependency series is quite a surprise.  It doesn’t fit the usual role of a second part of a trilogy, where the plot thickens, the crisis (or a number of them) is established and the main … Continue reading

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Book Review: Terms of Enlistment (Frontlines 1) by Marko Kloos

Much to my delight, there is no shortage of military science fiction.  To my even greater pleasure, Terms of Enlistment stands above the average.  That’s not to say it’s in any way exceptional, but it’s got all the right ingredients … Continue reading

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Book review: Artemis by Andy Weir

Andy Weir decided to strike closer to home.  After his trip to Mars with his well-known book The Martian, which saw a movie adaptation that further cemented Matt Damon’s typecasting as a damsel in distress, Weir turned his sights to … Continue reading

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Book Review: All Systems Red by Martha Wells

The first in the Murderbot series, and the first to win the Hugo Award for Martha Wells, All Systems Red started what appears to be a genuine phenomenon in modern science fiction.  All three of its sequels were nominated for … Continue reading

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Book Review: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

The Calculating Stars is a superbly written alternate history story, which mixes some very recent concepts and ideas with 1950s social norms.  It offers well developed characters, which the reader can get easily emotionally attached to, as well as sound … Continue reading

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Musings on Recent Hugo Award Winners (and Why I Didn’t Vote for Them)

It’s no coincidence that the following text reads like the ramblings of an old man who is struggling to understand the current generation.  It’s exactly that.  In the next few paragraphs I’ll try to verbalize why all of my Hugo … Continue reading

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Book Review: Binti: The Night Masquerade by Nnedi Okoafor

The third Binti book may have closed a series of highly successful books.  The first Binti was awarded the Hugo and Nebula awards, among others, for its very original ecosystem of Earth civilizations and aliens.  The second one got nominated … Continue reading

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Book review: The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèli Clark

The Black God’s Drums is a fun little adventure that takes place in a well-developed and engaging alternative timeline.  It may rely a little too heavily on worldbuilding at the expense of the story, but it is still engrossing, reminiscent … Continue reading

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