Author Archives: Bruncvik

Book review: A Psalm for the Wild-Built by Becky Chambers

Chambers has set a new trend in science fiction storytelling. Her works are usually very comfortable, inoffensive, full of hope, and light on technical details. She may not have been the first, but other writers are already being compared to … Continue reading

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Book review: Light from Uncommon Stars by Ryka Aoki

A feel-good book that does its best to juggle multiple plot lines, Light from Uncommon Stars is best enjoyed when the reader leaves all preconceptions behind, before turning to the first page. Even though the book has been nominated for … Continue reading

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Book review: The Past is Red by Catherynne M. Valente

Very few modern authors have the knack for presenting serious issues with so much light-hearted, yet insightful flair as Catherynne Valente. Her easy flowing prose is entertaining, inventive, and yet insidiously indoctrinates the reader into the author’s way of thinking. … Continue reading

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Book review: A Master of Djinn by P. Djeli Clark

With his inventive worldbuilding and spectacular visuals, P. Djeli Clark has become a mainstay of the awards circuit in the recent years. His blend of alternative history, magic, urban fantasy and exotic locales resonates with me and many others, and … Continue reading

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Book review: Elder Race by Adrian Tchaikovsky

A quick, entertaining read, Elder Race may appear fairly formulaic at the first glance.  Tchaikovsky’s idiosyncrasies in his writing style further enhance this perception.  However, the novella still includes a few hidden layers, which push it from a light evening … Continue reading

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Book review: A Desolation Called Peace by Arkady Martine

It’s often challenging to keep a sequel as interesting and engrossing as the first book in the series.  The wonder of worldbuilding may be largely gone, and the tedium of more of the same may creep in, as the author … Continue reading

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Opinion: How the Ukraine War Changed My Perception of Science Fiction

Science fiction is fiction, not a textbook or current affairs work.  Still, there are many subgenres, some of which are set in the real world, while others draw their timeline from the present time.  Of course, there are plenty of … Continue reading

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TV Review: Star Trek: Picard, Season 2

The second season of Picard is quite divisive.  Critics seem to love it, while the audience hates it.  Those who enjoyed the first season can’t seem to find anything positive about the second, and vice versa.  It’s small wonder: the … Continue reading

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Book review: Angles of Attack (Frontlines 3) by Marko Kloos

The Frontlines series is somewhat original by portraying its protagonists as human, with their failings, desires and small joys, and by strictly using the point of view of its central character.  There are no supermen, no overall strategic landscape from … Continue reading

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Hugos 2022 – Novelettes

This year’s nominated novelettes are thematically all over the place, from mythology, through vampires, to spaceships and robot swarms.  Stylistically, however, they are quite similar: most of them are very eloquently written, subtle, and with hidden meanings.  It was very … Continue reading

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